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Healing Our World Through Food Justice

The pandemic has highlighted ways the industrial food system is broken. At the same time, injustice has focused attention on racism in our country. Together, these two issues remind us that we are all connected.
sheep grazing at the central grazing company farm

The pandemic has highlighted ways the industrial food system is broken. At the same time, injustice has focused attention on racism in our country. Together, these two issues remind us that we are all connected. For us, the link is food justice. We can’t truly be healthy and whole when someone else is hurting. But we can choose to work toward a more caring, healthy and beautiful world — and food plays a key part.

What Is Food Justice?

Food justice covers a wide range of concerns related to how the current food system causes harm, especially for low-income populations and Black, Indigenous and People of Color (BIPOC). It addresses how everything we eat connects to environmental concerns, food sovereignty, food insecurity, racism, poverty and health.

Food justice deals with systemic issues that result in unhealthy food and environments. The industrial food system leaves us with a world where the earth is polluted, workers are mistreated and exploited, and communities suffer from a lack of nutritious food and increased disease and illness.

If you want to learn more, FoodPrint offers a great overview of food justice and the holistic and structural ways we can improve our food system.

How We Can Help

Given the number of complex and deeply-rooted problems that food justice touches, it’s necessary to be realistic — healing is often a long, hard process. We have to be motivated and committed to work for change.

There are many ways to help the food justice movement. Pay attention to where your food comes from, how it is produced, who is involved and what the process results in for people and the planet. As you see the full picture, you can actively choose to buy from producers who are making our world a better place and advocate for the rights of all people.

One important aspect of food justice is supporting BIPOC in empowering their communities. There are amazing individuals and organizations doing fantastic work through small farms, and some have been engaged in food justice for years. There’s probably a small farm near you where you can support BIPOC.

If you’re interested, we’ve found two helpful resources (in addition to the FoodPrint article above):


Healing Is Possible

We can do this! It’s not always easy, but it’s possible. We see it on our farm as we dedicate ourselves to regenerative agriculture. Being truly regenerative involves caring for the land as well as the people who work on it. When we do, we heal the earth, provide healthy food, grow local and regional economies and give everyone the chance to thrive.

Food sustains life and we can use it to create health, justice and opportunities for more people. We’re inspired to make a difference through food, and we hope you’ll join us. Together, we’ll grow a movement where empathy and solidarity lead to change.

sheep grazing on midwestern grass under a blue sky, on a farm that practices ethical animal farming in lawrence, kansas